Americans for truth about homosexuality website

In late February, when Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed the nation's harsh new anti-gay bill into law, he claimed the measure had been "provoked by arrogant and careless western groups that are fond of coming into our schools and recruiting young children into homosexuality." What he failed to mention is that the legislationwas itself largely due to Western interlopers, chief among them a radical American pastor named Scott Lively.Lively, a 56-year-old Massachusetts native, specializes in stirring up anti-gay feeling around the globe.

"They're looking for other people to be able to prey upon," Lively said, according to video footage.

"When they see a child that's from a broken home it's like they have a flashing neon sign over their head." Lively is not the only US evangelical who has fanned the flames of anti-gay sentiment in Uganda.

As they lose ground at home, where public opinion and law are rapidly shifting in favor of gay equality, religious conservatives have increasingly turned their attention to Africa.

And Uganda, with its large Christian population, has been particularly fertile ground for their crusade.

After finding God in a Portland, Oregon, treatment center in the mid-1980s, he joined a conservative evangelical church and took a job as communications director for the Oregon Citizens Alliance, which was loosely affiliated with the then powerful Christian Coalition and was deploying radical tactics to fight abortion and the gay rights movement.

In 1992, OCA introduced a ballot initiative with the first faint outlines of the legislative strategy Lively would later deploy abroad.Measure 9, as it was known, barred the state government from offering any "special rights" to gays or "promoting" homosexuality.It also required public schools to treat "homosexuality, pedophilia, sadism" as "abnormal, wrong, unnatural, and perverse." The backlash was fierce.Journalist (and past contributor) Jeff Sharlet has reported at length on the Family, a politically connected US-based ministry, which promotes hard-line social policies in the East African nation.But, according to Ugandan gay rights activists, Lively has played an unparalleled role in fostering the climate of hate that gave rise to Uganda's anti-gay law."The bill is essentially his creation," says Frank Mugisha, director of Sexual Minorities Uganda, a coalition of gay rights organizations.

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